exposed became my darker side
blog macabre
exposed became my darker side
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Arp 81: 100 Million Years LaterImage Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing - Martin Pugh 
Explanation: From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite image showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in this sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data. (via Astronomy Picture of the Day)
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The El Gordo Massive Galaxy ClusterImage Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al. 
Explanation: It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster. (via Astronomy Picture of the Day)
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wickedknickers:

1920s postcard by Leo
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steroge:

Carmen Mondragón, aka Nahui Ollin, ca. 1927 by Antonio Garduno
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girl-o-matic:

Photo by Bert Hardy
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hoodoothatvoodoo:

Werner Bischof
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hoodoothatvoodoo:

Alphonse Marie Mucha
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peterjaussie:

Lloyd Bacon, “Footlight Parade” 1933 by Gatochy on Flickr.
Lloyd Bacon, “Footlight Parade” 1933